WRI’s Austin Isinghood Selected Runner-up for WVU Student Employee of the Year

Written by Andrew Stacy on . Posted in Blog, News

Austin Isinghood (right) was awarded runner-up for the 2016 WVU Student Employee of the Year. He is pictured above with his supervisor Andrew Stacy.

Austin Isinghood (right) was awarded runner-up for the 2016 WVU Student Employee of the Year. He is pictured above with his supervisor Andrew Stacy.

Austin Isinghood, WRI’s undergraduate graphic designer, was selected as a runner-up for the 2016 WVU Student Employee of the Year.

Along with the three other finalists, Austin was presented with a certificate of appreciation by WVU President Gordon Gee at the awards ceremony on Monday, April 11 at 12:30 p.m. in the Mountainlair Ballroom. The winner was also announced at the ceremony.

Austin is a graduating senior majoring in graphic design in the College of Creative Arts.

“Austin was instrumental in helping WRI redesign and launch the new NIWR.info website,” said Andrew Stacy, WRI public relations coordinator and Austin’s supervisor. “Austin is a fantastic employee. He approaches every task with enthusiasm and a willingness to learn. He’s not afraid to try something new and is going to go on and do great things.”

Austin, we wish you the best. Many thanks for doing such great work for WRI!

-WVWRI-

ahs3/16/16

WVWRI Seeks Graphic Design Student Worker

Written by Andrew Stacy on . Posted in Blog, Employment, News

The West Virginia Water Research Institute is seeking a graduate or undergraduate student enrolled at WVU beginning immediately to perform the following duties:

• Design and layout of publications
• Assist in the planning, development and design of websites
• Other design related work

The successful candidate should have coursework or experience in the field of Graphic Design. Related professional work experience is desirable. Experience should include performing all the duties listed above. The successful candidate should also have good communication skills, be able to work independently and interact with a variety of individuals, and have a basic understanding of HTML, CSS and PHP. A working knowledge of the Adobe Creative Suite, particularly InDesign, Illustrator and Photoshop, is required. Candidates with 1 year or more of graphic design and/or programming experience are preferred.

This position closes April 20, 2016 or until the position is filled. To apply for this position, send a resume to: AStacy@mail.wvu.edu.

Water Institutes Come Together to Show Impact of WRRI Program

Written by Andrew Stacy on . Posted in Blog, News, Press Release

Water resources research institutes are required to leverage each dollar of federal support with two dollars of non-federal support. As a result, the WRRI program is one of the most cost-effective, cost-shared national research programs in the country.

Water resources research institutes are required to leverage each dollar of federal support with two dollars of non-federal support. As a result, the WRRI program is one of the most cost-effective, cost-shared national research programs in the country.

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – Outreach, communication, storytelling. These are important functions for any organization trying to get their message out. If the organization doesn’t do a good job telling their story people will fill that information gap with rumors, gossip or, perhaps even worse, they won’t know you exist. This is especially true when communicating the importance and impact of a program to members of Congress.

Each year, directors from the 54 water resources research institutes meet in Washington, D.C. at the National Institutes for Water Resources (NIWR) Annual Meeting. The institutes represent each state, as well as the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and American Samoa.

This year’s meeting was held in February and served as an important opportunity for the NIWR directors to meet with legislators and show the impact that the Water Resources Research Institute (WRRI) program has across the country.

“With the intense competition for the federal funding that does exist in congress, it’s important that people understand what the [WRRI] program does and what it offers,” said Dr. Richard Cruse, NIWR president and director of the Iowa Water Center. “In the absence of sharing our story, it’s easy for someone to lose site of the importance of this program.”

Water resources research institutes are required to leverage each dollar of federal support with two dollars of non-federal support. As a result, the WRRI program is one of the most cost-effective, cost-shared national research programs in the country.

The WRRI program differs from other water research programs in that the NIWR network represents the only authorized federal-state program that focuses on applied water resource research, education, training, and outreach.

“A critical nature of this program is that there is a grass roots, or bottom up, decision on what is going to be funded,” said Cruse. “Most of the other programs are decided in Washington, D.C. and the program panels decide what the research is going to be about. The WRRI program is decided at the state level.”

This is important because the staff at the institutes and the advisory panels that guide them are made up of people who live in the state and make decisions informed by research outcomes. They know firsthand the most important issues facing water users in their state.

Dr. Paul Ziemkiewicz, director of the West Virginia Water Research Institute, pointed out that water research priorities, at the state level, change according to industry and market changes, regulatory initiatives and crises.

“These priority changes can happen quickly and the WRRI program allows a rapid response to state legislatures, agencies, industry and the public,” said Ziemkiewicz. “This is a need that simply cannot be filled through programs that focus on national priorities.”

Water problems, however, are not bound by state borders but by the watersheds in which they reside. That’s why collaboration among institutes is one of the most distinctive aspects of the WRRI program; states working together to solve local, regional and national water issues. According to Ziemkiewicz, just as each institute provides a state level focus for water research, collaborations among institutes within a region helps draw research talent toward trans-boundary water issues and develop solutions for federal and state policy makers.

-WVWRI-

as/3/28/16

WVU teams up with the Boy Scouts to develop STEM program at Summit Bechtel Reserve

Written by Andrew Stacy on . Posted in Blog, News, Press Release

Coordinated by WVWRI, an interdisciplinary team of researchers from the WVU Davis College of Agriculture, Natural Resources and Design and the Eberly College of Arts and Sciences will introduce scouts and their adult leaders to the environmental STEM field, particularly the aquatic sciences, while using the site as an ecology observatory and laboratory.

Coordinated by WVWRI, an interdisciplinary team of researchers from the WVU Davis College of Agriculture, Natural Resources and Design and the Eberly College of Arts and Sciences will introduce scouts and their adult leaders to the environmental STEM field, particularly the aquatic sciences, while using the site as an ecology observatory and laboratory.

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. – West Virginia Water Research Institute Director Paul Ziemkiewicz announced today a project to establish an environmental science, technology, engineering, and math education and research program with the Boy Scouts of America’s Bechtel Summit Reserve near Oak Hill, West Virginia.

An interdisciplinary team of researchers from the WVU Davis College of Agriculture, Natural Resources and Design and the Eberly College of Arts and Sciences will introduce scouts and their adult leaders to the environmental STEM field, particularly the aquatic sciences, while using the site as an ecology observatory and laboratory.

The team will include Todd Petty, professor of wildlife and fisheries resources, Jim Anderson, professor of wildlife and fisheries resources, Nicolas Zegre, associate professor of forest hydrology, and Richard Thomas, professor of biology.

Through the program, scouts will earn merit badges while learning about ecology, biology, water science, wildlife and wetlands. Scouts will receive hands-on training through taking measurements, entering data and plotting simple graphs to see the results.

Fred King, vice president for research at WVU, is a strong supporter of the program. “This is a great opportunity to introduce a new generation of leaders to the environmental sciences, West Virginia and West Virginia University. They will find that we have a beautiful state and an outstanding natural laboratory to pursue meaningful studies while receiving hands on guidance from our leading environmental faculty.”

The reserve is the BSA’s newest high-adventure camp and is adjacent to the New River Gorge National River and more than 13 miles of the property border the park, providing access to more than 70,000 acres of managed, Appalachian highlands wilderness beyond the summit property. Up to 50,000 scouts are expected to be on site for major events such as the National Scout Jamboree, which typically takes place in July, with about 20,000 cycling through the site every two weeks during the remainder of the summer.

Federal funding of this project is provided through the U.S. Geological Survey’s section 104b program. The USGS awards 104b grants to State Water Research Institutes that have been established in each of the 50 states, three U.S. territories and the District of Columbia under the provisions of the Water Resources Research Act of 1984. The West Virginia Water Research Institute, a program of the National Research Center for Coal and Energy at West Virginia University, serves as a statewide vehicle for performing research related to water issues. WVWRI is the premiere water research center in West Virginia and, within selected fields, an international leader.

-WVWRI-

as03/21/16